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HomeEventsWellness Seminar: Poetry Workshop with Susan Meehan

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Wellness Seminar: Poetry Workshop with Susan Meehan

When:
Friday, June 8, 2018, 11:30 AM
Where:
South Common Room
River Park Mutual Homes
1311 Delaware Ave SW
Washington, DC  20024
Additional Info:
Contact:
Bob Craycraft
202-656-1834
Category:
Health and Wellness
Registration is required
Do you think there might be a poem in you?

Please join us in a workshop on learning how to express one's feelings through poems or non-rhyming verse. Whether you have something to share or just want to explore the idea of starting to write, this workshop is for you.

Susan Meehan, winner of the 2017 D.C. Poet Project, will lead the group.

Susan has a grant from the D.C. Commission of the Arts and Humanities to find ways to encourage senior villages to support continuing poetry/creative writing programs. This is the sixth of seven workshops sponsored under the grant serving the Dupont Circle, Palisades, and Waterfront Villages.

A light lunch will be offered following the seminar.

Venue is ADA compliant.
Capacity:
40
Available Slots:
38
Registrants & Fees
No Fee
No Fee
Susan Meehan grew up on Long Island’s North Shore during World War II. The North Shore at that time was rural, and forested, and because gasoline and oil were rationed she often watched her father and a neighbor use a double-handed saw to cut logs for heat. She was provided a classic education in a tiny but capable local Quaker school – three were two other students in her 8th grade class – where she became familiar with Quaker Plain Speech.

After graduating from Wellesley College and completing graduate school in Politics at Boston University, she worked hard to elect underdog Chub Peabody as Governor of Massachusetts. When he won, she joined his personal staff. After President Kennedy was assassinated, she took and passed the tests required to join the federal government as a management intern, in order to work on foreign aid.

Her first working day in Washington, in a training class, she found herself sitting next to a young man who talked so frequently that the instructor gave her an assignment on the spot to keep him from dominating the training class. She embraced that challenge fully, marrying him in 1967. The couple moved into a house in D.C.’s Dupont Circle area, and began to raise their family.


After the riots when Martin Luther King was killed, President Nixon set up an elected Police Community Relations board, to which Susan was elected. She nominated Marion Barry to serve as President of that committee, and subsequently served as his director of constituent services for Ward 2. Subsequently, Mayor Barry appointed her to serve as D.C.’s first citywide Patient Advocate for persons in drug or alcohol treatment. She stayed in that position for until her retirement, winning awards regularly, including “Kindest Person” in her agency, and runner-up in the “Best D.C. Government Employee of the Year” competition.


Susan served 12 years as an elected-at-large member of the D.C. Democratic State Committee, and 12 years as the first Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner in the Dupont Circle neighborhood. In that role she successfully led a major downzoning battle, spending a day in jail as a result. She was twice elected a Delegate to the Democratic National Convention — 40 years apart. She represents a Quaker point of view on the D.C. Council of Churches, and is its Vice President.


Click to read a Day Eight blog post announcing Susan Meehan the winner of the D.C. Poet Project.


The love poems in Talking to the Night are filled with tenderness as if they were flowers letting go of petals. Meehan has learned the tongue of birds. Her poems speak of wings to come.”

— E. Ethelbert Miller, Editor, Poet Lore


“Susan Meehan brings the same passionate commitment to her poems as she has to her life as an activist. Talking to the Night is populated with works that grab your attention with their clarity and fierce honesty… her poems’ authoritative power will fill your spirit.”

—Terence Winch